Making and Unmaking, Repair and Repetition by Helen Carnac

Making and Unmaking, Repair and Repetition is a virtual exhibition selection curated by Helen Carnac that seeks to explore the way ‘making’ and ‘unmaking’ things affects are thinking processes. She has selected six contemporary artists who explore ideas about  making, unmaking and repair in their work: Catherine Bertola, Andrew Burton, Julie Cook, Shelly Goldsmith, Amy Houghton and Jill Townsley.

Helen Carnac says:

‘Searching the Axis website, with the broad idea of finding innovative or contemporary approaches to craft and object making, has been an interesting process. The Crafts may be seen to be in a state of flux – the teaching of material based subjects is in upheaval, subject to budget cuts and in some places seen as an outmoded form of practice, and its need to be understood as a thinking process is somewhat denied. For me what cannot be denied is that making does offer both maker and viewer crucial ways of thinking, and that contemporary craft and object-making is acknowledged as important in the visual arts world and beyond.’

‘As an artist who makes things, objects, exhibitions and ideas, I am engaged with thinking critically about the reasons why we make and the necessity of making as a thinking process. That the ‘process’ is a crucial but often hidden stage has been a key issue for me over the last ten years.’

‘In curating this online exhibition I have looked for artists who explore concepts of repair, making, unmaking and repetition – all as ways of thinking. Repair in making is complex, it takes the understanding of how something has been made by its original maker to then repair or restore it. The making and unmaking processes that take place in order to do this involve a layering of knowledge and sensibility in the handling of material that develops through time spent, and an appreciation of changing technologies over time.

This article was sourced from the website  http://www.axisweb.org/atSelection.aspx?AID=2418

first accessed on 02/11/2012 last accessed 12/2/2012

view full text from this article

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s